1. Qwertee art theft: part 2

    A rundown and some updates on the Qwertee thing:

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  2. Mmm, art theft

    So I found this, uh, interesting specimen on sale today on Qwertee

    image

    It’s traced off an image I drew back in 2004 and appears to have been vandalized by a kindergartner in the process. (I’m actually really amazed that people are still plagiarizing this old thing after so long!)

    image

    I contacted the site over several obvious channels, but I have a feeling they’re not going to ‘notice’ my comments until their sales are all safely completed tomorrow.

    Normally I don’t make a fuss about people plagiarizing my Pokemon drawings (much less ten-year-old ones) since it’s just silly fanart that I don’t own the copyrights to anyway. But I’m posting about this incident because sites like Qwertee really rub me the wrong way. For those not familiar, Qwertee is one of many t-shirt design sites that allow users to submit potential designs to be voted on. Then, every 24 hours, they swap out their stock and sell a new batch of designs. (So if you’re seeing this post after July 9th, the stolen design will probably no longer be on the front page.)

    Why only 24 hours? Well, there are limitless benefits to this kind of setup: a huge influx of free unpaid labor (Qwertee pays its winners better than most, but only the winners—their ‘contest’ business model gives them a huge pool of free designs to pick from without having to compensate the majority of the artists who contributed their efforts), fresh new designs to profit off every day so the stock doesn’t get old, and, most importantly, the ability to get away with blatant copyright infringement and plagiarism—since they have such a small sell window, any stolen designs are already safely sold and off the market by the time people/companies notice and send in complaints. I find it incredibly opportunistic and incredibly skeevy.

    So there you have it. Qwertee, supporting unpaid artist labor, copyright infringement, and plagiarism. Normally, I’d say “blame the art thief, not the website,” but in my opinion these kinds of websites deserve every bit of scorn they can get.

  3. ravendroppings:

    daybreakboys:

    kihuotter:

    I have never ever opened bridge on purpose but it just keeps happening

    help this happens to me ALL THE TIME

    YES

  4. reapersun:

    Okay, this mentality is hugely fucking problematic. I put my stuff on the internet to share with people who like the stuff I like, in a space that I’m in control of. People taking it and putting it elsewhere against my wishes is not “just how the internet works”, it’s a disrespectful practice perpetuated by assholes who just want to take stuff that’s not theirs and use it to get notes or earn money or what the fuck ever. If people really liked my work and had respect for me as an artist and A PERSON they would allow me to control where my own work is displayed, and stop assuming just because you CAN download it and put it somewhere else, means you SHOULD. I don’t even understand how people could NOT understand the artists’ desire to maintain control of their work?? I’M the one who spent hours making it, just because I let people see it and have access to a digital copy doesn’t mean I suddenly wave all rights to it or should not give a shit what people do with it. If there were a way to share without allowing people to save it, believe me, I would do that.

    Also, it doesn’t matter how respectfully the work is taken. Consider a scenario here: the image is taken once, and put on instagram with credit. Then three other people see it from instagram. One puts it on pinterest with the tumblr source. The second puts it on weheartit with credit to the instagram, because hey, that links back to the source, that’s good enough, right? The third person forgets to link back at all, oh well. More people take it from all of those places, crediting any of those places in between. All of the different sources of this image mess with search engine algorithms and override the actual image source, making it harder to find. Someone from etsy looking for copyright free images to use on products finds one of these unsourced images and takes it and makes a bunch of money off it, hurting the artist financially and wasting their time as they struggle to get the products removed. Some idiot who wants to print out a bunch of johnlock porn to shock the actors on a talk show finds some reposted nsfw easily on google and suddenly an artist who just wanted to share their art with a few like-minded people is being mocked in front of millions of viewers. Eventually, the image comes full circle and is reposted on Tumblr with no credit, when it could have easily just been reblogged from the artist.

    This is ignoring all of the people who lie about the source and claim they made it, which DOES HAPPEN despite your claim that it does not. People claim ownership, people trace, people copy the style, people do all kinds of things when they think they’ll get away with it.

    This fucking happens. To almost all of the images I post. Multiple times. A day.

    How hard is it for people to just decide NOT TO BE AN ASSHOLE AND STEAL IT? Why do people always come back to the artist with this bullshit “well if you didn’t want it stolen why did you put it up??” victim blaming garbage? How does that make any sense except to people who want an excuse to steal??

    I’m going to publish this in case other people had this question burning on their mind and because I’m honestly so incensed that people even still ask this question after pretty much every internet artist has had to explain it a dozen times. However I hid their name because even though I’m really pissed off by messages worded this way I have nothing against them personally and don’t want to get them flooded with hate mail or whatever. I’d like to think you are honestly asking, but considering your message is worded like the millions of other messages artists get constantly questioning their rights to control how people share their work, with the standard assumption of my ignorance when it comes to “how things work” and undertone of judgement for thinking I would ever dare try to change “how things work”, forgive me if I’m skeptical.

    People who ask questions like this, YOU just don’t want to accept that you have done something the artist dislikes, so you throw the blame back on the artist. YOU don’t want to change the comfortable little way you’re spending your time online taking others’ works, so you try to convince the artist it’s their fault and it won’t change. This is YOUR problem. Ask yourself if you really want artists to stop sharing their work with you and then decide whether that’s a viable solution to this issue.

  5. To those with Stylish: you can remove those obnoxious ‘recommended posts’ from your dash by pasting in the code:

    .is_recommended {
        display: none;
    }

    ALTERNATELY if you have Xkit you can use the new Xkit extension to get rid of them

    ALTERNATELY if you have Adblock Plus you can use the following element hiding rule:

    tumblr.com##DIV[data-is-recommended="1"]

    All kinds of ways to avoid crap you don’t want to see!

  6. friednonsense asked: Being that you're an industry expert, I was hoping if there were any tips or advice you can give to an aspiring Animation Series creator. Any lessons you've learned from working in the industry from so many years. What advice would you give yourself if you were starting out trying to get you're animation picked up by a major network?

    giancarlovolpe:

    waltzforluma:

    ianjq:

    Yeah I have a big piece of advice! Stop “aspiring”!!!!! Your aspirations end now!!!!

    YES YOU! DON’T WAIT! START NOW! (passionate rambling incoming…)

    The freaking coolest thing about living in the year 20XX is that you don’t have to have anyone’s permission to be an Animated Series creator. Grab a trial copy of Flash, or make flipbooks, or your own GIFs, or make some stop motion with your phone. Just start making whatever you want! Don’t save your good ideas for some big-wig executives or networks. Just do them right now! Don’t be precious with your ideas, just put them out there. 

    Content that’s on TV or in movies is not “more official” than stuff you make in your home on your spare time to share with friends on the internet. It’s all the same!!!!! As long as you enjoy it, who cares!! And if other people happen to like it also, then BONUS!! 

    The experience you get from trying to make something good on your own is so much more important than any future dream of being a big shot. Upload what you do to the internet and get feedback, show it to as many people as you can and listen to critiques. Learn to do stuff all by yourself, and only for your own pleasure.

    From what I’ve seen, the people who end up creating a good animated series are the same people who have been creating their own stories, cartoons, comics and music on their own just for fun long before they ever got the shot at the big-time. Read about how your favorite cartoons are made, and try to do the process on your own. You’ll learn what your strengths are and what you’re interested in exploring.

    (If you don’t have the facilities to create animation on your own, make something smaller scale- like a script, a comic, or a storyboard!)

    OK THEN HERE’S STEP TWO: once you’ve learned to love your work on your own and figured out what you like to draw and what you’re passionate about, you may get a chance to pitch an idea. And thanks to the work you’ve done, you’ll be READY! Instead of some half-finished ideas, you’ll be able to point to all the amazing stuff you’ve created on your own and say “look, I already know what I like, AND I already know how to do it!” —-that’s WAY more impressive than an undeveloped idea with nothing to show for it. PLUS, the bonus of doing good work on your own is that you’ll attract attention and opportunity! I know so many people working in this industry who were discovered from their own silly personal work that was just randomly found online. 

    GET TO IT! DON’T WAIT FOR ANYONE’S PERMISSION TO BE THE CREATOR YOU WANT TO BE! START NOW! YOU HAVE TO START NOW! DON’T YOU MAKE ME COME OVER THERE AND FORCE YOU TO DO IT! YOUR “ASPIRATION DAYS” ARE OVER!

    Everyone, LISTEN TO PAPA JQ! Even though he’s addressing animation, the same thing applies to all creative fields - even music 

    It’s all true!

  7. thewolfofhyrule:

    Drew some quality fanart of Mewitti’s fursona today

    oh my god ;u;

    I’m rocking those shades

  8. Thank you! I want to try this since I find myself sleepy all the time on my current cycle , so I find this appealing!

    I hope you can find some relief with polyphasic. I also have huge problems on a monophasic schedule: I need around 9-10 hours of monophasic to feel even remotely rested, and even then I get incredibly sleepy during the afternoons. Plus, I tend to feel more and more depressed the more I sleep.

  9. mochaspar asked: With the polyphasic sleep cycles how do you know it is safe to do and healthy? I would love to try it but would be worried I'd hurt myself.

    Hi, this is me never remembering to answer my asks on time!

    TL;DR: I don’t.

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  10. xekstrin:

    (source here)

    the commentary under the comic itself is also worth reading 

    this is not to say haters, as they are traditionally defined , don’t exist! there is energy and action in hate, there is a sense of power. i know people who hate things because it’s fun to hate them. i’ve also indulged in this. there are people who live to be cruel, because they are powerless in every other area of their life.

    but the other side of the coin is to disregard all negativity as hate. and i have always thought negativity was allowed to be part of the conversation — depending on how it’s expressed. this is why i love parody and satire. good satire destroys its target from within — and the only way it got inside is because its originator loved the thing they took apart. it demands self-reflection, which is always useful. no one is immune to it. and something stronger and more bulletproof can emerge.

    it’s too easy to discount detractors as haters, or just jealous. it is really, really hard to read negative comments. a single one can obliterate 100 positive ones. but amid the hate, maybe someone has a good point. you have to wade through it from time to time. it can make you miserable — but it can also keep you humble. 

    (Source: fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)